HTP Prints

Narcissism Book of Quotes

Vaknin, Sam (2002) Narcissism Book of Quotes.

Full text available as:
Other (Word 2000 Document (DOC))
HTML

Abstract

Narcissism is a pattern of traits and behaviours which signify infatuation and obsession with one's self to the exclusion of all others and the egotistic and ruthless pursuit of one's gratification, dominance and ambition. Whether narcissism and its pathology are the results of genetic programming (see Anthony Benis and others) or of dysfunctional families and faulty upbringing or of anomic societies and disruptive socialization processes - is still an unresolved debate. The scarcity of scientific research, the fuzziness of the diagnosic criteria and the differential diagnoses make it unlikely that this will be settled soon one way or the other. It is the psychoanalytic belief that we are all Narcissists at an early stage of our lives. As infants and toddlers we all feel that we are the center of the Universe, the most import ant, omnipotent and omniscient beings. At that phase of our development, our parents are perceived by us to be mythical figures, immortal and awesomely powerful, there solely to cater to our needs, to protect and nourish us. Both Self and others are viewed immaturely, as idealizations. This, in the psychodynamic models, is called the phase of "primary" narcissism. Inevitably, the inexorable processes and conflicts of life erode these perceptions and reduce the ideal into the the real. Adaptation is a process of disillusionment. If this process is abrupt, inconsistent, unpredictable, capricious, arbitrary and intense - the injuries sustained by the infant's tender, budding, self-esteem, are severe and, often, irreversible. Moreover, the empathic support of our caretakers (the Primary Objects, the parents) is crucial. In its absence, our sense of self-worth and self-esteem in adulthood tends to fluctuate, to alternate between over-valuation (idealization) and devaluation of both Self and others. Narcissistic adults are widely thought to be the result of bitter disappointment, of radical disillusionment in the significant others in their infancy. Healthy adults accept their self-limitations (the boundaries and limitations of their selves). They accept disappointments, setbacks, failures, criticism and disillusionment with grace and tolerance. Their self-esteem is constant and positive, not substantially affected by outside events, no matter how severe.

EPrint Type:Other
Keywords:narcissism, narcissistic personality disorder, psychopathology, therapy, relationships, abuse, psychotherapy, personality disorders, cluster B, DSM IV, self, ego, object relations, psychodynamics, NPD
Subjects:Psychology > Personality
Psychology > Psychopathology
Psychology > Social
ID Code:22
Deposited By:Vaknin, Sam
Deposited On:26 March 2003
Alternative Locations:http://samvak.tripod.com/freebooks.html, http://www.suite101.com/welcome.cfm/npd, http://www.healthyplace.com/communities/personality_disorders/narcissism/index.html