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Divergences in American psychiatry during the Depression: Somatic psychiatry, community mental hygiene, and social reconstruction. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 37 (2001): 369-388.

Pols, Dr Hans (2001) Divergences in American psychiatry during the Depression: Somatic psychiatry, community mental hygiene, and social reconstruction. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 37 (2001): 369-388. . Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 37:pp. 369-388.

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Abstract

The differences between somatic psychiatrists and mental hygienists, already apparent earlier, became much more pronounced during the Depression years, partly as a consequence of their different perspectives on this social crisis. Somatic psychiatrists, emboldened by the apparent success of new medical treatment methods, reasserted the central position of the mental hospital within psychiatry, attempted to improve the discipline's position within medicine, and promoted basic research. Mental hygienists, following the ideal of prevention, proposed far-reaching programs of community mental hygiene to alleviate widespread mental distress. A small group of mental hygienists embraced socialism and advocated measures of radical social reconstruction. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

EPrint Type:Journal (Paginated)
Keywords:History of American Psychiatry History of Mental Hygiene Movement National Committee for Mental Hygiene George K. Pratt Frankwood E. Williams
Subjects:Psychology > Psychiatry
Chronology > 20th Century
History > Institutions
Geography > North America
ID Code:185
Deposited By:Pols, Hans
Deposited On:18 August 2003
Alternative Locations:http://www.usyd.edu.au/hps/staff/hans/jhbsart.htm

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